Frank Cottrell Boyce promotes World Book Day at Alsop

Students from north Liverpool primary schools visit Alsop High School to hear award-winning children’s author. Frank Cottrell Boyce speaks about his passion for both reading and writing. 


Alsop High School held a special event for students from partner primary schools to prepare them to celebrate World Book Day. The school hall was packed with students, who were enthralled by Frank Cottrell-Boyce, who spoke about his childhood, achievements, his career, his passion for reading and his role as children’s author.

Frank gave students a taste some of his writing from his eleven magnificent books that have a large impact on his readers. He read from his most recent book, Runaway Robot.  

Mr Wilson, Headteacher comments: “We were delighted that Frank found time to engage with students from our partner primary schools. As the Alsop Patron of Reading Frank is very keen to encourage and develop a reading for pleasure culture, both within Alsop and schools in North Liverpool. During his visit, Frank was able to award prizes for a recent Alsop 500 word writing competition. As a judge he said he was astounded by the quality of the entries.” 


Mrs Tapia-Bowes, Disciplinary Literacy Coordinator writes: “The visit the highlighted our schools endeavour to close the vocabulary gap. Reading is such a powerful educational tool and one of the most remarkable adventures that anyone can have. If we read stories, they have the power to motivate, persuade, inform and inspire. Using the words of Kofi Annan ‘Literacy is a bridge from misery to hope.” 



After the presentation, Mr Cottrell Boyce began a book-signing event and young people were eager to meet the author in person. Hopefully, the students left Alsop feeling inspired by Mr Cottrell Boyce’s magical words from his book 'The Unforgotten Coat.'

‘And in that moment, I felt my own ignorance spread suddenly out behind me like a pair of wings, and every single thing I didn’t know was a feather on those wings. I could feel them tugging in the air, restless to be airborne.’